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Museums and the local area

In the interconnected sites inland from Bibione, there are numerous activities for tourists to enjoy as part of an all-embracing holiday experience in which the beach and the sea are just the first of a long series of attractions.

The coastal and inland areas complement each other and offer visitors an endless array of original opportunities. What will you find in the surrounding area? Historic towns and villages, museums, archaeological sites, natural environments, and a host of farms where you can sample traditional local products.

Exploring the area at a leisurely pace really brings out the best of its many delights and helps you to see that the town and its surroundings are not separate entities but intertwined parts of a coalesced whole.

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This building is part of Villa Dalla Pasqua and, together with the Belfiore Mill, forms a sort of closed courtyard to the right of the River Loncon. The Castellina has recently been restored. It has a polygonal shape and features a framework of brick eaves in Medieval style. Arts and recreational events are organised here. 

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Built in 1458, the Church of St. John the Baptist is located in the area of Settimo. The land for its construction was donated by Giovanni Battista Banchiani from San Vito and Daniele di Toffolo donated land to maintain the resident priest.
Inside the church of St. John the Baptist are “The Adoration of the Magi” and “The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian and Saint Anthony Abbot”, both by Gian Francesco del Zotto, known as da Tolmezzo; the “Madonna del Latte” by a pupil of the Pordenone, Calderari, and “Stories of the Baptist” by Cristoforo Diana.
On the main altar is a particularly fine “Virgin and Child with Saints John the Baptist and Mark”, by Alessandro Varotari, known as il Padovanino.



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Inaugurated in 1984, the museum houses a large part of the memorabilia of Ippolito Nievo, one of Italy’s most popular writers and the author of the novel “Confessions of an Italian”.
It contains around one hundred items, including a trunk and clothes belonging to the writer. The collection was initially made possible thanks to materials from the Castle of Colloredo of Montalbano, where it was originally housed. The castle was forced to remove these items due to the major earthquake that hit Friuli in 1976.
In the display cabinets of the “Ippolito Nievo” Museum in Fossalta di Portogruaro – housed in the Town Arts Centre – are all the editions of the aforementioned masterpiece and an original copy of the newspaper “Il Caffè”, signed by Nievo..




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The Gaspari Temple is a funerary temple that houses the remains of Gaspare Luigi Gaspari, his son, and wife Rosa de Egregis Gaspari. Designed by architect Andrea Scala from Udine, the temple is one of the best examples of Neo-Classicism in Friuli Venezia Giulia.
It has a quadrilateral central body and has the three apses on three sides. The facade is in Neo-Classical style and it is covered by a large centre cupola with three semi-cupola covering the three apses. The Gaspari Temple has been declared a building of special interest by a Ministerial Decree.

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This is housed in the St. Agnes’ Tower in the historic centre of Portogruaro. The Town Museum, opened in 1999, reconstructs the story of the town from the 12th century to the 20th century, highlighting and exploring the various aspects of public, private, civic and religious life in the town through the relics contained there. It contains many stone crests of noble families from Portogruaro, statues, libation dishes, inscriptions and ceramics. There are also fine 19th and 20th century prints, including a portrait of Quintino Sella as a member of the Accademia dei Lincei in 1877. 

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St. Agnes’ Gate was built in the 12th century. It is owned by the Municipality of Portogruaro. Various restorations have taken place over the centuries, from the 16th century onwards, when podestà Girolamo Zorzi had pavement laid down from the tower to the bishop’s palace. 

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A beautiful example of an 18th century Veneto villa, Villa Freschi is located in the ancient hamlet of Ramuscello Vecchio. An avenue of poplar trees leads to the villa, which has a large courtyard with the manor house in the background. On the sides are two barchesse (rural service buildings). The ancient church of St. Anastasia is also here. To the rear of the villa are the grounds and a lake.


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Manor Houses
The countless manor houses in the area, inspired by or originating with the Venetians, are extremely well built and prestigious.
The most important:
include Villa Rubin, built in the 18th century by the Papadopoli, with a square Venetian plan over three floors;
Villa Migotto, featuring elegant stone cornices;/p>
Villa Murador, with an elegant balcony on which there are two mono spheres separated by a little column and a central salon illuminated by double lancet windows with semi-circular arches and exposed stone balconies;
Villa Migotto, where all the windows of the piano nobile have archivolts and the cornice of the eaves has a modilion;
Villa Gubitta, which dates back to the 16th-17th centuries;
Villa Correr Agazzi, which has recently been restored and is suitable for hosting all kinds of events;
Villa Piva, set in the centre of a large agricultural estate.


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 This was built in 1592 at the behest of monsignor Matteo Sanudi, Marquis of Cordovado, who accepted the request of a woman (and of the local community) who was the protagonist of an extraordinary and miraculous event: the apparition of the Virgin Mary who requested that a church be built and dedicated to her.
The Sanctuary was completed in 1602 and consecrated on the first of May the following year. The fame of the graces and miracles spread beyond Veneto, as far as Austria, from which dozens of the faithful came on pilgrimage.
The main altar has an image of the Virgin Mary by Andrea Bortolotti, known as “il Brunello”.















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Excavation in Concordia began in the last century. A Roman bridge was found under the town and a 4th-5th century B.C. burial ground known as the soldier’s burial ground was discovered on the left of the River Lemene.
In 1983 remains of the Baths were brought to light and, in the square in front of the cathedral, remains were discovered of homes with drains and floors, as well as a part of the Decumanus Maximus, the main street of the town.
The via dei Pozzi Romani (a side street of via S.Pietro) saw the discovery of two Roman wells.


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The landowners homes of Annone, including the famous Gianotto rural home, are decorated with frescoes inside the porticoes. The Gianotto rural home has frescoes dating back to the 16th century. There is also the important 17th century Villa Polvaro, located in Spadacenta.

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The ancient church of Fossalta, founded around the year 1000, was demolished in 1893. The new church was designed in 1892 by engineer Federico Berchet, followed by architect Domenico Rupolo, who completed the work.
The “domo de Fossalta” (Fossalta cathedral) was completed in 1896. There is still a great deal of work to finish and over the years the two large marble altars of the Holy Virgin of the Belt and of St. Biagio and the altar were placed in the lateral transepts.
The completion of the new main altar, also designed by Rupolo, completed the choir stalls and the upper part of the apse, right above the Lugugnana Canal, together with the construction of two lateral sacristies.


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This is without doubt the oldest church in Latisana. It was first mentioned in 1368. In the 18th century the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist underwent radical renovation, with the addition of Baroque elements to the facade. A few relics remain of the ancient church, probably in late-Romanesque style, including the whole frame of a rose window and its central keystone. The rose window elements are now displayed on the northern side of the church.
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This was built in the mid-12th century then restored from 1252-56. After 1281 it took the name of the St. Francis Gate, after the adjoining church of the same name. It was also restored in the mid-16th century when the podestà Giorgio Gradenigo had what is now via Martiri paved. Its current name, Porta San Gottardo, recalls another church, which was originally outside the gate, on the site of the present Care Home for the Elderly. 

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The typical Mills of St. Andrew (named after the town district in which they are located) are part of Portogruaro’s ancient heritage, which are highlighted by the setting of the historic centre. They were cited in a papal bull of 1186 as “Portum de Gruario cum molendinis”. They were initially used for milling and today have been converted into an art gallery.
They host exhibition openings and prestigious cultural evenings.

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This was designed by the architect Balestra and was the property of the Mocenigo family until the eve of the First World War, then passing into the hands of the Mayer family from Trieste, to the Sinigallia and the Gandolfi. To the left of the entrance is a tall rice stack, powered by a wheel placed on an artificial canal, which is now no longer in use. Today the building is the property of the ATER, which has carried out extensive restoration and has transformed it into a private residence.

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Lino Grando has always loved local memorabilia and other objects and has an extraordinary collection of furnishings, knick knacks and objects from the daily lives of our ancestors. Giannino Fontanel’s private museum is an extraordinary example of a historic reconstruction of the First World War. Inside are thousands of objects, from uniforms to camp utensils. It is a monument to our history. 

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This was the first sanctuary built in Italy in honour of the Holy Virgin, known as the “Madonna of Fatima”.
Work began in 1947 on land donated by Count Gaetano Marzotto, on the outskirts of the town of Portogruaro, along the Treviso-Portogruaro state highway. The foundations of the church and the convent were laid on 13th September 1949 and excavation began two days later.
The sanctuary was consecrated by Bishop Vittorio De Zanche on 13th May 1954. Since 1999, the convent adjacent to the sanctuary has been the home of the Centre for Evangelisation of the Capuchins of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia.







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This was built around the mid-12th century and was once called Porta del Bando and then Porta S. Lazzaro (St. Lazarus’ Gate) after the lepers’ 
hospice of the same name, which was built in 1203 on what is now via Zappetti. It was restored in 1555-56 by podestà Girolamo Zorzi, as the inscription above the gate recalls.

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The facade of the Church of St. Biagio is in Renaissance style. However, in 1937, it collapsed and was rebuilt in a classical, neo-Palladian style. The current church has three naves and was completed at the end of the last century.
Inside is a marble baptismal font made by Giovanni Antonio Pilacorte in 1486 and an altarpiece of the crucifixion by Gregorio Lazzarini. The latter is a fine painting that effectively renders the dramatic tension of the event.


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