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Built in 1458, the Church of St. John the Baptist is located in the area of Settimo. The land for its construction was donated by Giovanni Battista Banchiani from San Vito and Daniele di Toffolo donated land to maintain the resident priest.
Inside the church of St. John the Baptist are “The Adoration of the Magi” and “The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian and Saint Anthony Abbot”, both by Gian Francesco del Zotto, known as da Tolmezzo; the “Madonna del Latte” by a pupil of the Pordenone, Calderari, and “Stories of the Baptist” by Cristoforo Diana.
On the main altar is a particularly fine “Virgin and Child with Saints John the Baptist and Mark”, by Alessandro Varotari, known as il Padovanino.



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This is a continuous, open space gallery. It is located near the Mills; in a very small, intimate space. It continually combines different projects and influences, with all kinds of installations and painting. It is managed by the Porto dei Benandanti Arts Association. 


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The Museum was founded in 1885 and named the National Museum of Concordia to underline its close relationship with the nearby archaeological area of Concordia Sagittaria. It was headed by Dario Bertolini, who first organised the archaeological material in the building. Most of the materials are relics discovered between 1873 and 1882 in the vast archaeological area of Concordia Sagittaria; above all the burial site from the late Roman Age.

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 Portogruaro town hall was erected in two different periods. The central part was built in 1265. Initially it reunited the original and free citizens of Portogruaro in a general assembly and later became the headquarters for meetings of the Maggio Consiglio, (The May Council) with 15 aristocratic members of 25 years of age or more.
This appointed the Podestà (a rare privilege for a Municipality, granted by Bishop Tisone da Camino). In 1371 the Palace caught fire and between 1372 and 1380 a new loggia was built with Ghibelline battlements.
The two lateral wings were built in the 16th century. In 1848 the building was partly decorated in “questionable Gothic style” and in 1887 the prison was moved to the ground floor of its new headquarters in via Seminario.


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The facade of the Church of St. Biagio is in Renaissance style. However, in 1937, it collapsed and was rebuilt in a classical, neo-Palladian style. The current church has three naves and was completed at the end of the last century.
Inside is a marble baptismal font made by Giovanni Antonio Pilacorte in 1486 and an altarpiece of the crucifixion by Gregorio Lazzarini. The latter is a fine painting that effectively renders the dramatic tension of the event.


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Manor Houses
The countless manor houses in the area, inspired by or originating with the Venetians, are extremely well built and prestigious.
The most important:
include Villa Rubin, built in the 18th century by the Papadopoli, with a square Venetian plan over three floors;
Villa Migotto, featuring elegant stone cornices;/p>
Villa Murador, with an elegant balcony on which there are two mono spheres separated by a little column and a central salon illuminated by double lancet windows with semi-circular arches and exposed stone balconies;
Villa Migotto, where all the windows of the piano nobile have archivolts and the cornice of the eaves has a modilion;
Villa Gubitta, which dates back to the 16th-17th centuries;
Villa Correr Agazzi, which has recently been restored and is suitable for hosting all kinds of events;
Villa Piva, set in the centre of a large agricultural estate.


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This was founded in 730-735. In 899 it was sacked by the Magyars but St. Mary’s Abbey rose again and was fortified in the 10th century. In 967 Emperor Otto I donated the abbey to Rodoaldo, the patriarch of Aquileia. From 1441 - 1786 the abbey became a commendam and in 1818 the religious jurisdiction returned to the diocese of Concordia and the abbey was finally re-established in 1921.
The first walls were created in the 10th century, after the devastation caused by the Magyars. The facade is dominated by a fresco representing the lion of St. Mark, dating back to the late 15th century. Below it is a bas-relief with the crest of cardinal Grimani, to the left is a fresco where the Grimani crest is repeated and to the right there is a fresco of a crest with a cross, whose ownership is unknown.
Beyond the entry tower you access a large courtyard that has recently been paved, onto which all the main buildings of the abbey complex look. There is also a brick bell tower here.

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Nowadays, going to a fairground is a bit like stepping into a time machine and suddenly finding yourself taken back to the years when playing outside was a totally absorbing experience for children.
Fairs are filled with spellbinding sensations. Children take away lifelong memories of the colourful lights, the music, and the sweet smell of chocolate and candy floss.
Are you on holiday in Bibione! Would you like to take your children to a fairground where they can have a whale of a time, just like you did when you were little? Luna Park Adriatico in Bibione is the place for you! It spans a huge 12,000 m² and you can take your pick from no fewer than 65 rides!
What will you find at the fairground?
There are rides for children of all ages. For little ones, there’s a traditional merry-go-round with horses, a little pirate ship, canoes, mini motorbikes, aeroplanes, a train, mini bumper cars, a slide and many more fun activities that kids can enjoy by themselves as their parents keep a close eye on them. Then there are the attractions for adults, such as flying cages, go-karts and (if you’re brave enough!) the fire bat. In addition, teenagers and adults can put their skills to the test at the target-shooting, hook-a-duck, wheel of fortune and ring tossing stands. Then there are attractions for people of all ages, such as the ghost train, big wheel, hall of mirrors and rollercoaster.
Where is it?
Luna Park Adriatico is in Piazza Mercato on Via del Sagittario. You can get there by walking along the main roads in the town. Alternatively, there’s a large car park for those who choose to drive there!
Promotions and contact details
On the Promotions page of the website (www.lunaparkadriatico.com), there are coupons that you can download, print, cut out and take to cash desks at the attractions to get money off.
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The National Museum of Concordia is certainly a reference point in the entire area of Concordia and Portogruaro for the Roman and Christian history of the area and relics that are evidence of its most important stages. However, a few years ago, a Civil Archaeological Museum was also opened in Concordia Sagittaria, containing recently discovered relics from the Roman, Paleo-Christian and Romanesque periods. 



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St. Agnes’ Gate was built in the 12th century. It is owned by the Municipality of Portogruaro. Various restorations have taken place over the centuries, from the 16th century onwards, when podestà Girolamo Zorzi had pavement laid down from the tower to the bishop’s palace. 

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Excavation in Concordia began in the last century. A Roman bridge was found under the town and a 4th-5th century B.C. burial ground known as the soldier’s burial ground was discovered on the left of the River Lemene.
In 1983 remains of the Baths were brought to light and, in the square in front of the cathedral, remains were discovered of homes with drains and floors, as well as a part of the Decumanus Maximus, the main street of the town.
The via dei Pozzi Romani (a side street of via S.Pietro) saw the discovery of two Roman wells.


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The parish church of St. Vitale dates back to the 15th century, but it was rebuilt in the 17th century and restored in 1946.
During restoration in 1763 an octagonal pinnacle surmounted by another pinnacle was added. Inside there is a monumental main altar, an architrave structure with a coffered ceiling, tympanum and lateral niches, the work of the stonemason Rinaldo from Portogruaro. The antependium has a bas-relief of Christ and two angels in symmetrical movement.
The altar originally contained an altarpiece of St. Vitale, now probably substituted with a copy. The bell tower is from the 16th century, and was probably built on a previous military tower.
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This was the first sanctuary built in Italy in honour of the Holy Virgin, known as the “Madonna of Fatima”.
Work began in 1947 on land donated by Count Gaetano Marzotto, on the outskirts of the town of Portogruaro, along the Treviso-Portogruaro state highway. The foundations of the church and the convent were laid on 13th September 1949 and excavation began two days later.
The sanctuary was consecrated by Bishop Vittorio De Zanche on 13th May 1954. Since 1999, the convent adjacent to the sanctuary has been the home of the Centre for Evangelisation of the Capuchins of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia.







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The current cathedral is to all effects the last of a series of cathedrals that were built over time in Concordia Sagittaria. The first dates back to the late 15th century and was destroyed by the invasion of the Huns in 452.
The later cathedral was submerged when the River Lemene broke its banks in the mid-6th century. Other cathedrals were built in the 11th and 14th centuries.
The present construction dates back to 1466, and was commissioned by Bishop Antonio Feletto. It was completed in the 19th century, with the building of the choir stalls. At the beginning of the 20th century, during the bishopric of monsignor Francesco Isola, the present facade was built and the Martyrs’ Chapel was added, with the crypt in which their reliquaries are preserved.
The exterior of the church has a walled facade in exposed brick. In the centre of the Romanesque façade is the portal, surmounted by a circular rose window. Each of the two lateral naves has a single lancet window. On the right hand side of the church is a 12th century bell tower, 28 metres high, with two tiers of mullioned windows on each facade, and the baptistery with the layout of a Greek cross and a small cupola.
The exterior of the Gothic-style apse is decorated with another four mullioned windows. The interior of the cathedral is in the form of a Latin cross, with three naves separated by two lines of rounded arches resting on quadrangular pillars with semi-columns. In the Martyrs’ Chapel, enlarged at the beginning of the 20th century by the future cardinal Celso Benigno Luigi Costantini, is an altarpiece by Alessandro Varotari, known as “il Padovanino”.


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This is housed in the St. Agnes’ Tower in the historic centre of Portogruaro. The Town Museum, opened in 1999, reconstructs the story of the town from the 12th century to the 20th century, highlighting and exploring the various aspects of public, private, civic and religious life in the town through the relics contained there. It contains many stone crests of noble families from Portogruaro, statues, libation dishes, inscriptions and ceramics. There are also fine 19th and 20th century prints, including a portrait of Quintino Sella as a member of the Accademia dei Lincei in 1877. 

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The noble homes of Portogruaro frame the historic centre and embellish its architectural beauty. The most important include the 15th century Palazzo de Götzen, Casa Longo, with its important decorative compositions, Palazzetto Fratto, which also hosted Ippolito Nievo, Palazzo Moro, with two elegant trifora, and Palazzo Muschietti, still embellished today by an external frieze featuring fruit under the eaves of the roof. 

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This was built around the mid-12th century and was once called Porta del Bando and then Porta S. Lazzaro (St. Lazarus’ Gate) after the lepers’ 
hospice of the same name, which was built in 1203 on what is now via Zappetti. It was restored in 1555-56 by podestà Girolamo Zorzi, as the inscription above the gate recalls.

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